Friday, June 20, 2014

Don't Let Mushrooms Endanger Your Children ~Teach Them Caution


Keep your children safe by teaching them to not mess with mushrooms they find in the playgrounds, parks and vacant lots in and around your community!
 

Amanita magniverrucata mushrooms with their exaggerated warts on the cap are certainly spectacular enough to attract attention from curious kids.  The large erect warts on the cap set it apart, making it look like a white pine cone or a glob of meringue. Buttons (emerging mushrooms) resemble a puffball, and the two buttons, found near this pair of mature older Amanita magniverrucata in the Seed Company Park in Rockford, Washington, resembled rounded puff balls with no warts appearing yet, and the gills on the underside were pinkish.
Known also as Pine Cone Amanita they can be found growing gregarious under pine trees, or solitary like this pair found close to the pine tree at the southwest corner of the playfield ~~ far enough away from the swings and ball diamond to not attract attention from youngsters who frequent the park.
The specie develops slowly and persists for weeks without decaying. Edibility is reported in "Mushrooms Demystified" by David Arora as "Unknown--do not experiment! It belongs to the Lepidellas, a subgroup of Amanita that contains poisonous species."

Like most mushrooms, this specie are often difficult to positively identify without a microscope but they should not be eaten, and if handled, hands should be thoroughly washed with soapy water so as not to transfer toxins to other foods.
 






















































































































 

 

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